I-95/I-695 Interchange

Baltimore County, Maryland

Jeffrey Sauers of Commercial Photographics
Jeffrey Sauers of Commercial Photographics
Jeffrey Sauers of Commercial Photographics
Jeffrey Sauers of Commercial Photographics
Jeffrey Sauers of Commercial Photographics

As the nation’s longest north-south interstate, I-95 is both a critical and highly congested transportation corridor along the east coast. According to the I-95 Coalition, the interstate serves an area “over three times more densely populated than the U.S. average and as densely settled as much of Western Europe.”

The goal of the Maryland Transportation Authority’s (MDTA) $994 million Express Toll Lanes (ETLs) program, consisting of multiple projects along an eight-mile segment of I-95, between the I-95/I-895 split to north of MD 43, is to ease congestion and increase safety by making improvements to I-95, reconstructing bridges and interchanges, and adding ETLs. Once completed, two ETLs and four general purpose lanes (GPLs) in each direction will offer motorists a choice of travel.

The I-95/I-695 Interchange Project was the first major phase of the ETLs program. This $200 million project involved the reconstruction of the double braided directional I-95 interchange with I-695 to a fully directional, multi-level interchange that eliminates current left-turn lane configurations. The reconstruction involved removing the existing double-braided interchange and constructing a new and reconfigured four-level interchange for general-purpose roadways and ramps, along with various other features to facilitate construction of the managed roadways and ramps in the follow-on contract. Also included were the reconstruction of Kenwood Avenue and Lillian Holt Drive overpass bridges, associated roadway approaches, and driveway adjustments. The reconstruction extends along I-95 from north of the Hazelwood Avenue overpass to south of the King Avenue overpass, and along I-695 from west of the Lillian Holt Drive overpass to west of the I-695/Philadelphia Road Interchange. The work involved utility relocations, demolition, excavation and embankments, stream relocation, pavement milling and resurfacing, full-depth pavement construction, new bridge structures, new storm drain improvements, new stormwater management facilities, new retaining wall structures, new noise wall structures, landscaping, signing, marking and interim intelligent transportation system (ITS) improvements, and lighting.

During the peak of construction, KCI had 15 full-time construction management and inspection team members on site to support this high profile project.

G. Scott Lang PE, CCMExecutive Vice President, Construction Management Discipline Manager

G. Scott Lang PE, CCM

KCI was asked to step in early on as “replacement” construction manager for the interchange project and quickly righted the ship while potentially saving MDTA millions of dollars in time and labor.